Tinder set to add video chatting next month so users can date virtually under coronavirus lockdown

Tinder set to add video chatting to the app next month so millions of users can date virtually while under coronavirus lockdown

  • Tinder is set to add video chatting to its app by the end of next month
  • The feature aims to let its users virtually date while under coronavirus lockdowns
  • The firm also noted that it has seen a surge in women swiping on the site 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: | Updated:

Tinder is set to make online dating amid coronavirus lockdowns more personal.

The dating site is adding a video-chatting feature to its popular app by the end of June, allowing those in isolation to virtually meet one-on-one.

The feature was announced during the Match Group’s, Tinder’s parent company, first quarter earnings call and this is the largest addition to the platform since launching in 2012.

Along with the video chatting service, Tinder also shared that it has seen a surge in usage during the pandemic – with women users swiping 37 percent more each day than before.

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Tinder is set to make online dating amid coronavirus lockdowns more personal. The dating site is adding a video-chatting feature to its popular app by the end of June, allowing those in isolation to virtually meet one-on-one

‘Tinder clearly remains a go-to app for meeting new people, which has become an even more critical service with so many people stuck at home, and Tinder plans to launch one-to-one live video late in Q2,’ reads the letter to shareholders from Match Group CEO Shar Dubey .

‘Tinder’s product roadmap for the year largely remains on track, and we remain committed to developing and testing a number of new revenue features in 2020, though priorities could shift quickly depending on how the crisis continues to unfold.’

Dating apps have given millions of singles the opportunity to meet potential mates while in lockdown during the coronavirus.

And Match Group, the parent company of Tinder, Hinge, OKCupid and PlentyofFish, is reaping in the benefits.

Along with the video chatting service, Tinder also shared that it has seen a surge in usage during the pandemic – with women users swiping 37 percent more each day than before

The firm announced it has generated over $544 million in revenue during the first quarter of 2020, which is a 17 percent increase year-over-year, Business Insider reports.

However, the outbreak has seemed to change the way online dating operates, as a survey reveals 70 percent of Hinge users are interested in going on video chat dates and 94 percent of OkCupid members are currently dating virtually.

‘Social distancing has required adaptations and pivots and has impacted our business because the manner in which singles engage with our products and start relationships has quickly evolved,’ Dubey wrote.

‘We know that singles are adjusting their behaviors, and many are shifting to having dates virtually via phone or video.’

Many of Match’s apps include video chatting, but Tinder has always been the lone wolf by only offering in-app messaging.

But at the end of June, the popular dating site is set to join the rest of the pack.

Tinder has also reached ‘all-time highs’ in daily swipes since the start of the coronavirus.

The most noticeable increase has been seen among female users under the age of 30, as they are swiping 37 percent more in April than the last week of February.

‘Female usage and engagement is a key driver for a dating product’s success and we are constantly trying to improve these metrics,’ states the letter.

‘This shift in female behavior is an extremely positive development for our ecosystem.’

HOW CAN YOU CHECK IF YOU ARE BEING CATFISHED?

Dating apps and online websites are plagued with fraudulent profiles, known as ‘catfishes’.

‘Catfishing’ originated as a term for the process of luring people into false relationships, however, it has also come to encompass people giving out false information about themselves more generally. 

These profiles often use images of another person to allow users to pretend to be someone else in order to get a date, or scam money from a lonelyheart.

Fortunately, there are certain ways to check if these profiles are real people or if they are bogus accounts —

1. Google reverse image search

This is probably the most valuable tool for catching out a catfish and can be done via Google. 

To kickstart the process, people need only right-click the photos that are arousing their suspcions, copy the URL and paste it into images.google.com.

The search engine will search to see if the image has been used elsewhere.

If you find the picture associated with a different person to the one you’re speaking to on your dating app, it’s likely you’ve met a catfish! 

2. Use an app called Veracity 

It is useful for dating sites such as Tinder, Bumble and Grindr as it allows images from Dropbox or Camera roll (or similar) to be cross-referenced against any matching results.

Load the app, then select a screenshot of the suspicious dating app profile from your camera roll to launch the search.

The app will tell you if the picture belongs to somebody else. 

3. Check their Facebook 

Almost everyone who has a profile on a dating site will have a Facebook account (most dating apps require users to have one, after all!) so it is always advisable to track down your potential suitor on other forms of social media.

4. Google them

Google and other search engines have an extensive repertoire and most people will crop up in a search. 

In this day and age, it’s unusual for someone to have nothing on Google.

Have a search through for them or their relatives, things they’ve said or posted in the past. If there’s nothing, that should raise alarm bells.

5. Skype/Facetime/Video Chat 

For prospective romantic engagements, seeing the face of someone you are virtually talking to is essential. 

6.  Money

Anyone that asks for money online or via an app is likely to be a fraud. 

This is probably a scam and should provide immediate red flags.   

 

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